Psychology

For more information regarding graduate courses offered through the Department of Psychology, please contact a program assistant.

Course NumberCourse NameDescriptionCredit Hours
PSYC6001 Statistics and Design I The first part of this course focuses on reviewing the principles of research design and research methods. This includes the logic and principles of hypothesis testing, different types of research (non-experimental research, experiments and surveys), research designs, and the basic foundations of measurement theory (not necessarily in that order). After a brief examination of descriptive statistics, we will go on to simple correlation, bivariate regression, and finally, the most general 'univariate' technique, multiple regression. Required course.Prerequisites: none. 3 ch
PSYC6002 Statistics and Design II This course will cover research methods, designs, power issues, inferential statistics, and data interpretation relevant to categorical variables. Within this context, we will examine techniques such as Chi square, t-tests, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) and a brief introduction to Multivariate ANOVA. Between-subjects and within subject designs will be considered. Relevant SPSS applications will also be examined.Prerequisites: None. 3 ch
PSYC6003 Multivariate Statistics Multivariate analyses examine the relations of multiple variables of sets of variables (e.g., multiple independent and/or dependent variables, repeated measurements of the same variable). The first part of the course will continue on from Psyc 6002 , covering topics such as discriminant function analysis, survival analysis, and canonical correlation. The second part will introduce the structural equation modeling framework and specific techniques (e.g., factor analysis, path, and growth models). Overall, the course will emphasize conceptual understanding of these techniques: when they are appropriately applied, what they do, and how they are interpreted. Statistical software applications will be included. Students in the clinical program are required to take Psych 6003 Multivariate Statistics or Psych 6004 Qualitative Methods. Elective course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6001 , 6002. 3 ch
PSYC6004 Qualitative Research Methods The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the qualitative/social constructionist paradigm in psychology and to the use of qualitative methods in psychological research. The course focuses on qualitative methods involving collection and analysis of verbal/linguistic data (e.g., people's accounts of their experiences and written records and documents). Specific methods discussed include interviewing and use of transcribed or printed texts. These methods are considered in conjunction with the analytic approaches of grounded theory and discourse analysis. Students will have the opportunity to carry out a qualitative analysis project with the aid of computer software designed for this purpose. Elective course.Prerequisites: none. 3 ch
PSYC6005 Principles of Psychological Science This course provides an overview of research methods in psychology. The first part of the course concerns general research methods and professional issues. The second part covers specific research methods relevant to areas of psychology available on both UNB campuses. Possible topics include: field research, industrial / organizational, psychophysics and signal detection, operant and classical conditioning, cognitive neuroscience, neuropsychology, developmental psychology, and applied research. The actual topics covered will be tailored to the needs and interests of the students enrolled in the course. This course is offered alternating years on the Fredericton and Saint John campuses. Required Course. 3 ch
PSYC6019 Independent Study Requesting an increase to credit hours so that credit for this course assigned after one term is equivalent term courses affiliated with both our Graduate programs (where all term courses are 3 ch). 3 ch
PSYC6062 Social Psychology This seminar addresses a wide range of themes in social psychology, with special attention given to the interrelationships between individuals, groups, and societies. The course focuses on core areas of theory and empirical research, including social cognition, attitudes, persuasion, group conformity and cohesion, interpersonal attraction and the self. We examine recent theoretical and empirical advances in social psychology rather than focus on the “classics” alone. Discussion emphasizes research models and techniques and how best to apply them to problems of current interest in social psychology. 3 ch
PSYC6072 Seminar in Developmental Psychology This seminar is designed to provide a review of theory and research on topics related to human development across the life span. Specific topics may focus on multiple aspects of development during one part of life span. Specific topics may focus on multiple aspects of development during one part of the life span (e.g., adolescence, adulthood) or on one aspect of development (e.g., cognitive development, social development), across the life span, depending on the expertise of the instructor. Emphasis will be on normative developmental trajectories rather than deviations in development (e.h. psychopathology). 3 ch
PSYC6101 Ethical Standards for Psychologists This course will examine ethical standards for psychologists involved in research, teaching, and applied work based on the most recent version of the Canadian Code of Ethics for Psychologists. The course uses a problem-based learning approach in which students research relevant issues and then use the ethical standards to resolve ethical dilemmas. Class meetings will involve little or no lecturing but much discussion, informed by research and the Code of Ethics. Required course.Prerequisite: None. 3 ch
POLS6102 Professional and Ethical Issues in Clinical Psychology This seminar may be taught by the Practicum Coordinator and introduces students to professional issues and practicum training settings affiliated with the clinical program. Topics covered include licensing requirements and examination in New Brunswick, by-laws of the College of Psychologists of New Brunswick, status and issues of professional psychology in Canada, the practice of clinical psychology, and advocacy and regulatory issues in the profession. Practitioners who are knowledgeable about the practice and regulation of psychology within the province may be invited as guest speakers. In addition, part of the seminar will involve site visits to various practicum settings around the province. This will provide students with an orientation to practicum training opportunities and introduce them to potential practicum supervisors. Required course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6101 . 3 ch
PSYC6111 Seminar in Perception This seminar course covers various topics in sensation and perception, with emphasis on vision and hearing. Possible topics include: basic processes in vision and hearing, music perception, language perception, cerebral functions involved in perception, color perception, perception of size and distance, and sound localization. This course consists of weekly meetings where students present assigned readings for discussion. 3 ch
PSYC6191 Cognitive Science This course investigates the fundamental principles of learning, memory and cognition. Topic areas such as attention, semantic and episodic memory, language comprehension and processing are covered. In addition, various theoretical frameworks of how information is represented in the brain are investigated. This course consists of weekly meetings where readings are discussed and critically evaluated. Evaluation involves a final paper summarizing various aspects covered in the course. 3 ch
PSYC6202 Lifespan Psychopathology This seminar provides an overview of theory and research on a broad range of psychological disorders and how they may present in clinical settings that serve children, adolescents, and adults. First, current conceptual frameworks and classification systems used to understand psychological disorders will be evaluated. Then the symptoms and DSM diagnostic criteria for specific disorders will be reveiwed, with attention to similarities and differences in the presentation of disorders across development. Factors such as gender differences, etiology, and comorbidity will also be considered. Prerequisites: none. 3 ch
PSYC6204 Brain and Behaviour The seminar reviews the organization of the human brain and how the brain produces behaviour (e.g., thoughts, feelings, movements, perceptions, memories) using evidence from experimental and clinical human neuropsychology. A core set of topics will be used to examine the major neocortical and subcortical regions in the brain together with their associated neuropsychological functions as well as how these regions work together to produce complex adaptive behaviour. Additional topics may include experimental and clinical measures of brain functioning and cognitive maturation and decline across the lifespan. Critical thinking about brain-behaviour relationships will be emphasized. 3 ch
PSYC6211 Assessment Skills with Children and Adolescents The goal of this clinical skills course is to provide students with core knowledge and initial skills relevant to the psychological assessment of children and adolescents. Seminar topics include reviews of various assessment procedures and specific instruments used with children and youths (e.g., interviews, intelligence and academic skills tests, behavioural rating scales, self-report measures); and discussion of key issues (e.g., combining data from multiple sources) and ethical and professional situations that may arise during assessments. Students will also have an opportunity to acquire beginning skills in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of instruments often used with school-aged children and adolescents (e.g., the WISC-IV, WIAT-II) and with report writing. Required course.Prerequisites: none. Estimated number of practicum hours: 20 3 ch
PSYC6212 Assessment Skills with Adults This clinical skills course has three main goals. The first goal is to provide training in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of a standard test of adult intelligence. The second goal is to provide training in administration, scoring and interpretation of an objective test of personality. The third goal is for students to gain familiarity with other selected tests of cognitive functioning and personality. The current status of the intelligence concept and the role of intelligence testing in clinical assessment will also be examined, along with an appraisal of personality tests and their clinical uses. Required course.
Prerequisites: none. Estimated number of practicum hours: 20
3 ch
PSYC6214 Neuropsychological Assessment Skills This skills course takes the basic knowledge and thinking of PSYC 6204 to the next stage. Students learn to administer neuropsychological assessment instruments and to interpret the results. The goal is for students to learn to use various types of information in the assessment of the capabilities of individuals and how to draw conclusions about the functioning of these capabilities. To achieve this goal a variety of neuropsychological tests will be practised and students will receive supervision and feedback in their administration and interpretation. The culmination of this course is to conduct testing and interpret results for a client who has suffered damage to the nervous system. Elective course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6204 . Estimated number of practicum hours: 20 3 ch
PSYC6311 Therapy Skills with Adults This skills course is designed to equip students with the basic interviewing and psychotherapy skills necessary to intervene with a variety of clinical problems. Students will develop interviewing skills using a micro-counselling approach involving instruction, modeling, and role-playing feedback. They also will develop psychotherapy skills that can be employed across technique. Students will implement these skills by conducting three 50-minute sessions with undergraduate volunteers in which they will define the problem, establish therapeautic goals, and make recommendations for intervention. Students also will learn about empirically-supported therapies used to address common psychological problems in adults. (e.g., depression, personality, disorders). 3 ch
PSYC6312 Basic Therapy Skills with Children The skills course will survey issues and procedures involved in the treatment of common child and adolescent emotional and behaviour problems. Students will develop basic interviewing skills needed for interactions with children ranging in age from early childhood to adolescence and with parents, teachers and others who may effect change in a child. The focus will be on developing basic skills that can be employed across techniques. Students will also learn about emperically-supported therapies across a range of modalities (e.g., individual, family, group) that are used to address common problems (e.g., anxiety depression, behaviour difficulties). The course may take various formats depending on the instructor, student enrolment, and availablity of volunteers. Prerequisites: None. Estimated number of practicum hours: 20 3 ch
PSYC6313 Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Adult Anxiety Disorders The aim of this advanced clinical skills course is to provide students with knowledge and basic skills in cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for adult anxiety disorders. Students will receive elementary training in specific CBT manualized treatment protocols for specific phobias, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder with or without agoraphobic avoidance, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and possibly health anxiety. Specialized skills taught in the course include assessment and case formulation for the anxiety disorders, the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV, exposure-based interventions, cognitive restructuring, and relaxation training. Skills will be acquired through assigned readings, didactic presentation, videotape demonstrations, role plays, and individual practicum supervision. Elective course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6311 . Estimated number of practicum hours: 20 3 ch
PSYC6314 Cognitive Therapy Skills for Adult Depression The aim of this advanced clinical skills course is to provide students with knowledge and basic skills in cognitive therapy for depression. This primary theoretical orientation is Aaron T. Beck’s cognitive therapy, although other cognitive-behavioural approaches will be introduced (e.g. behavioral activation, mindfulness relapse prevention). Clinical skills taught in the course include cognitive-clinical assessment of depression, case formulation, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, developing the therapeutic relationship, offering psychoeducation, identifying negative thoughts and beliefs, cognitive restructuring, behavioural experimentation, setting homework assignments, evaluating treatment, and relapse prevention. Skills will be acquired through assigned readings, didactic presentation, videotape demonstrations, role plays, and individual practicum supervision. Elective course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6311 . Estimated number of practicum hours: 20 3 ch
PSYC6315 Therapy Skills with Parents, Families and Children The purpose of this clinical skills course is to provide students with advanced training in interventions with parents families and/or children. The course will consist of a brief review of relevant treatment theory and techniques, and may take one of two formats, depending on availability of clients, student enrolment, and instructor availability. Under one format, students will be assigned clinical cases for assessment and intervention. Cases will be screened in advance to select ones that are focused primarily on the child and/or family and where interventions are expected to be reasonably short in duration. Under another format, students will be responsible for planning and delivering a parenting course aimed at improving child behaviour; they will run group sessions and assist individual parents in implementing behaviour change programs. Examples of the kinds of behaviour problems anticipated include anger management, compliance, fears, eating/bedtime problems, and pervasive developmental disorder. Under either format, students will work in close collaboration with the instructor and classes will be organized in a case conference format. Elective course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6203 , PSYC 6312 . Estimated number of practicum hours: 20
PSYC6316 Therapy Skills with Adolescents The purpose of this course is to provide students with training in the basic skills necessary to offer interventions to adolescents. The course will review theory and research that addresses interventions appropriate for youths and will highlight the importance of considering adolescents within their developmental contexts (e.g., family, peers, school). Through the use of assigned readings, demonstrations, role plays, and live sessions with at least one youth, students will gain experience with the skills required to conduct an initial interview, establish a therapeutic alliance, assess suicide risk and substance abuse, evaluate the role of the family in an intervention, facilitate the therapeutic process, and terminate an intervention. Ethical dilemmas that arise during interventions and issues related to specific populations of youths (e.g., adolescent sex offenders) also will be discussed. Elective course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6203 , PYSC 6312 . Estimated number of practicum hours: 20 3 ch
PSYC6318 Elective Skills Course Under this course title a variety of advanced skills topics will be offered on an occasional basis depending on faculty resources and student interests. It is assumed students will have the fundamental skills in assessment and intervention prior to enrolling in an advanced elective skills course. Topics taught under this course will focus on more specialized psychological assessment and/or intervention skills. As well elective skills courses may emphasize psychological approaches to very specific problems or populations. Examples of possible elective skills topics include couples therapy, group therapy, treatment of sexual problems, cognitive therapy for obsessions and compulsions, cognitive behavioural treatment of panic, feminist approaches to therapy, treatment of children's phobias, behavioural interventions with autism, and assessment and intervention in children with non-organic failure to thrive. Elective course. Estimated number of practicum hours: depends on skills topic offered.Prerequisites: PSYC 6311 or PSYC 6312 . 3 ch
PSYC6353 Teaching Apprenticeship I All students in the Experimental program are expected to complete a teaching apprenticeship under the supervision of a faculty member. The course assignment may be broadly related but not identical to the thesis research. It is expected that the course will be selected from lower level rather than fourth year courses, and the choice of course may depend in part on the needs of the undergraduate program. Teaching should help the student develop a broader understanding of her or his field and facilitate confidence and skills in oral presentation. The teaching apprenticeship requirement involves responsibility for a term course under close faculty supervision and is divided into two parts: preparation and actual teaching. Teaching Apprenticeship I represents the preparation phase and should normally take place during the term immediately preceding the term in which the course is to be taught. In Teaching Apprenticeship I, students are expected to attend all lectures given by the supervisor in the relevant course. Weekly preparatory meetings between the student and the faculty supervisor are also required. These meetings are used to monitor the student-teacher's progress in planning all aspects of the assigned course, including preparation of a general teaching philosophy, a course outline and marking scheme, lectures, demonstration materials, assignments, and examinations. Course credit is awarded upon successful completion of the course requirements as determined by the teaching apprenticeship supervisor in conjunction with the student at the beginning of the term. Required course.Prerequisites: none. 3 ch
PSYC6354 Teaching Apprenticeship II The teaching apprenticeship requirement involves responsibility for a term course under close faculty supervision and is divided into two parts: preparation and actual teaching. Teaching Apprenticeship II represents the actual teaching phase and should normally take place during the term immediately following completion of Teaching Apprenticeship I. In Teaching Apprenticeship II, the faculty supervisor will attend lectures on a regular basis, but will not be an active participant in the course. Ongoing regular meetings between the faculty supervisor and the student will be used to provide the student with feedback on the content and/or delivery of the course material. Course credit is awarded upon successful completion of the teaching assignment (i.e., final grades for the course are submitted). Required course. Prerequisites: 3 ch
PSYC6401 Seminar in Clinical Psychology I This seminar course will focus on a variety of topics and issues in clinical psychology. Faculty will be assigned to teach a clinical seminar on a rotating basis. The seminars are intended to provide the student with an advanced, critical understanding of theory and research on selected topics relevant to clinical psychology. Students are expected to be actively involved in discussion of assigned readings, library research on selected topics, class presentations, and seminar discussion. These seminars will adopt an academic approach to specific knowledge domains in clinical psychology rather than an experiential or skills acquisition orientation. An example of topics included under this course are gender issues in clinical psychology, treatment of sexual problems in clinical practice, developmental and clinical issues with families, theory and research in experimental clinical psychology, violence against women and children, and group processes. Requirement: students must take at least one clinical elective seminar.Perequisites: none. 3 ch
PSYC6402 Seminar in Clinical Psychology II This seminar course number will be used in conjunction with PSYC 6401 for clinical students who elect to take a second clinical seminar course. Elective course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6401 . 3 ch
PSYC6404 Group Processes This course is designed to: 1) help students develop an understanding of how groups operate and evolve, 2) practice skills involved with group facilitation, 3) acquire knowledge and awareness of the impact various facilitation styles can have on group process, and 4) learn to modify one's facilitation style to reach different outcomes. Further, the course aims at fostering the development of skills in designing, running, and evaluating groups. Elective course.Prerequisites: none. 3 ch
PSYC6405 Cognitive Behaviour Therapy The aim of this clinical seminar is to provide students with an advanced, critical understanding of theory and research pertaining to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for children, adolesecents, and adults. Students will learn about the fundamental approach of CBT for assessing and treating a variety of disorders, adapting CBT for implementation across the lifespan, case formulation, and manualized therapy. Students are expected to be activley involved in discussion of assigned readings, library research on selected topics, and class presenations. Basic skills in CBT will be acquired through videotape deminstrations, role-plays, and peer-to-peer practice of specific therapeutic elements, such as cognitive restructuring and relaxation training. 3 ch
PSYC6406 Clinical Seminar: Special Topics I The aim of this clinical seminar is to provide students with an advanced, critical understanding of theory and research on selected topics relevant to the practice of clinical psychology. Topics will rotate depending on the expertise of the instructor. Where relevant and possible, a lifespand perspective will be adopted. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, working with families or groups, sexual problems, autism, health psychology, forensic issues, and neuropsyhology. Students are expected to be activley involved in discussion of assigned readings and class presentations. Basic skills will be acquired through videotape demonstrations, role-plays, and peer-to-peer practice of specific assessment of therapeutic elements. 3 ch
PSYC6407 Clinical Seminar: Specials Topics II This course number will be used in conjunction with Psyc 4606 for clinical students who elect to take a second clinical seminar. 3 ch
PSYC6408 Evidence-Based Practice The aim of this seminar is to help student apply their clinical skills and knowledge to evidence-based practice. The course uses a problem-based learning approach in which students will research relevant issues in order to develop evidence-based assessment and diagnostic plans, case conceptualizations, and treatment plans for a variety of child, adolescent, and adult cases. Clinical cases will be designed to highlight a number of important concepts, including approaches to assessment and diagnosis, models of psychotherapy, and ethical decision-making. Issues related to individuals, couples, and families as well as gender and cultural sensitivity will be discussed. 3 ch
PSYC6519 Advanced Research Apprenticeship Research experience and training is considered an integral part of graduate training in clinical psychology. Students who are admitted into the program with a Master's degree from another institution are required to participate in an advanced research apprenticeship during their first year in the program, usually with their thesis supervisor. It is expected that students will be exposed to multiple aspects of the research process, including some combination of background, reading, study design, data collection, data analysis, and manuscript preparation. Students will submit to the Clinical Program Committee by February 1 of their first year a brief description of their apprenticeship project (250-300 words) and a timeline for carrying out the specific activities associated with completing this project (e.g ethics submission, data analysis). In late June (specifc date TBA), students will make a 15-minute oral presentation of their apprenticeship project to clinical faculty and students. A written report of their project, in journal article format, is due to the supervisor the same day. The supervisor will normally assign credit (i.e a letter grade)by June 30. In most cases, the student will collaborate with the supervisor on revisions to the apprenticeship report prior to submission for conference presentation and/or publication. Required course for students entering the program with a Master's degree from another institution.Prerequisites: None. 3 ch
PSYC6521 Master's Research Apprenticeship Research experience and training is considered an integral part of a graduate in clinical psychology. During the Master's year of the MA/PhD clinical program, all students are required to participate in a master's research apprenticeship with their dissertation thesis supervisor. he purpose of this apprenticeship is to familiarize the student with a body of research and to form a foundation for the Ph.D. Research Apprenticeship. The completed project will be a research proposal and will consist of a literature review, methods section and proposed analyses. Normally the timeline for completion will be as follows: May 15, students present their proposals to the department. June 15 final draft of the project is due. The final project will include: 1) an introduction section with literature review, research question(s) and hypotheses: 2) a method section with description of participants, procedure and planned analyses; and 3) a timeline for carrying out the specific activities associated with completing the study (e.g., commencement of data collection, data analysis, writing a revision of manuscript). The CPC will review the timeline for feasibility. August 1, ethics submission due. Supervisors normally assign credit (i.e. a letter grade) for the apprenticeship after the ethics form has been submitted.Prerequisites: none 3 ch
PSYC6522 PhD Research Apprenticeship During their first year in the Clinical PhD program, all students are required to participate in a research apprenticeship under the supervision of their thesis supervisor. Students will conduct, analyze, and write up an independent research study based on the Master’s Research Apprenticeship. They will submit a written report of their project, in a journal article format, to their supervisor for feedback and evaluation. The timeline for completion is as follows: Following ethics approval of the Master’s Research Apprenticeship in the Fall of their first Ph.D. year, students begin data collection. September 1 of their second Ph.D. year, the final project is due to the supervisor; students present their results to the department the first Friday afternoon following Labour Day. The supervisor will assign credit (i.e. a letter grade) when the student has completed the apprenticeship requirements.Prerequisites: Psyc6521 6 ch
PSYC6523 Co-Teaching Apprenticeship Teaching is often an important part of the role and duties of clinical psychologists. Because of this, all students are expected to complete a teaching apprenticeship under the supervision of a faculty member. The purpose of the teaching apprenticeship is to offer students a chance to acquire teaching skills within the context of a supervised experience. Students in the clinical program will typically co-teach a lower level undergraduate course (e.g. Introductory Psychology, one of the Foundations courses) with a faculty member. The availability of specific courses may vary from year to year depending on departmental resources. Required course.Prerequisites: none. 3 ch
PSYC6525 Clinical Comprehensive Examination The purpose of the comprehensive examination is to provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate the integration of theory, practice, and evaluation in an applied or clinical context based on the scientist-practitioner framework. The aim is to contribute to and evaluate the student’s depth and breadth of preparation in the content, methodology, and theory of clinical psychology. The examination will evaluate students’ competencies in reference to the program’s values and principles. Students are also expected to demonstrate a broad and critical understanding of major trends and controversies in the field. The comprehensive examination is a closed book written exam completed on a single day in mid April. Students are referred to the Guidelines for the Clinical Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination in the Graduate Student Handbook for further details. Required Course.

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PSYC6541 Master's Research Apprenticeship Research experience and training is considered an integral part of graduate training in Experimental Psychology. During the Master's year, all students are required to participate in a master's research apprenticeship with their thesis supervisor. Work will begin in the fall term and continue into the summer. It is expected that students will be exposed to most phases of the research process, including background reading, study, design, data collection, data analysis and manuscription preparation. By the end of the summer term, the student should have prepared a written research report in journal article format. The supervisor will assign a letter grade when the student has completed the apprenticeship requirements. In most cases, the student will collaborate with the supervisor on revisions to the research report prior to submission for conference presentation and/or publication. Required course.Prerequisite: none. 6 ch
PSYC6542 PhD Research Apprenticeship During their first year in the experimental and PhD program, all students are required to participate in research apprenticeship under the supervision of their thesis supervisor. It is expected that students will design, conduct, analyze and write-up an independent research study. At the end of the summer term, students are expected to submit a written report of this research, in journal article format, to their supervisor for feedback evaluation and feedback. The supervisor will assign credit (CR/NR) when the student has completed the apprenticeship requirements. Required course.Prerequisite: PSYC 6541 . 6 ch
PSYC6621 Practicum in Adult Clinical Psychology Students are required to complete at least 350 practicum hours in adult clinical psychology as a prerequisite for the pre-doctoral internship. They may complete practicum training in any pre-authorized practicum setting provided that they have the prerequisite clinical courses and approval from the Practicum Coordinator. Either Psyc 6621 or Psyc 6622 must be completed as a three to four month full-time clinical placement. The other practicum courses may be taken on either a full-time or a part-time basis as long as they exceed 250 hours in total. Practicum training will normally begin in the summer term of the second year and extend over the next two years of the program. In order to be credited toward practicum hours, the necessary documentation must be submitted to the Practicum Coordinator. Please refer to the Practicum Policy Manuel for further details. Required course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6101 , 6102 , 6202 , 6203 , 6205 , 6212 , 6211 , 6311 and 6312 . Number of practicum hours: 350 0 ch
PSYC6622 Practicum in Child/ Adolescent Clinical Psychology Students are required to complete a least 350 practicum hours in child/adolescent clinical psychology as a prerequisite for the pre-doctoral internship. They may complete practicum training in any pre-authorized practicum setting provided they have the prerequisite clinical courses and approval from the Practicum Coordinator. Either PSYC 6621 or PSYC 6622 must be completed as a three to four month full-time clinical placement. The other practicum courses may be taken on either a full-time or a part-time basis as long as they exceed 250 hours in total. Practicum training will normally begin in the summer term of the second year and extend over the next two years of the program. In order to be credited towards practicum hours, the necessary documentation must be submitted to the Practicum Coordinator. Required course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6101 , PSYC 6102 , PSYC 6202 , PSYC 6203 , PSYC 6205 , PSYC 6211 , PSYC 6212 , PSYC 6311 and PSYC 6312 0 ch
PSYC6623 Advanced Practicum in Clinical Psychology Students are required to complete an additional 300 practicum hours in a pre-authorized practicum setting of their choice. They may complete these remaining hours as part of one or both of the primary practical placements (i.e., PSYC 6621 or PSYC 6622) or by completing an additional advanced practicum in a setting of their choice. The aim of this advanced practicum is to provide students with an opportunity to acquire clinical skills on a specialized clinical problem or more advanced skills with a particular clinical population. Students may complete practicum training in any pre-authorized practicum setting provided that they have the prerequisite clinical courses and approval from the Practicum Coordinator. The practicum may be taken on either a full-time or a part-time basis as long as the student spends at least 250 hours in the selected setting. Practicum training will normally begin in the summer term of the second year and extend over the next two years of the program. In order to be credited toward practicum hours, the necessary documentation must be submitted to the Practicum Coordinator. Please refer to the Practicum Policy Manual for further details. Required course.Prerequisites: PSYC 6101 , PSYC 6202 , PSYC 6203 , PSYC 6205 , PSYC 6211 , PSYC 6212 , PSYC 6311 , PSYC 6312 , PSYC 6621 and PSYC 6622 . 0 ch
PSYC6624 Predoctoral Clinical Internship All clinical students are required to complete a 12 month full-time organized internship in a recognized psychological services unit under the supervision of licensed psychologist. It is expected that internship supervision and training will follow the guidelines for internship accreditation of the Canadian Psychological Association. Normally students will apply for the internship during the fall term of their fourth year after completion of all courses and other program requirements. In addition data collection and analysis for the thesis should be completed before starting the internship. On completion of the internship, the Director of the Clinical Program will recommend that the student should be given credit for the internship once notification has been received that the student has completed all internship requirements. Required course. 0 ch
PSYC6625 Advanced Practicum 2 Students may choose to complete a second advanced practicum in a setting of their choice. The aim of this second advanced practicum is to provide students with an opportunity to acquire additional clinical skills on a specialized clinical problem or more advanced skills with a particular clinical population. Students may complete practicum training in any pre-authorized practicum setting provided that they have the prerequisite clinical courses and approval from the Practicum Coordinator. This practicum may be taken on either a full-time or a part-time basis as long as the student spends at least 250 hours in the selected setting and the selected practicum (i.e., setting or clinical rotation) has not been previously completed by the student. In order to be credited toward practicum hours, the necessary documentation must be submitted to the Practicum Coordinator. Please refer to the Practicum Policy Manual for further details.Prerequisites: Psyc 6101 , 6102 , 6202 , 6203 , 6205 , 6211 , 6212 , PSYC 6311 , PSYC 6312 , 6621 , 6622 , and PSYC 6623 . 0 ch
PSYC6631 Assessment Practicum Students are required to complete a minimum of 250 practicum hours involved in assessment activities at the UNB Psycholgical Wellness Centre (PWC). These hours should be split apporoximatley equally betweem activities that target child/adolescent clients and adult clients. Students will normally complete their adult assessment hours 1 day/week during the winter and the spring/summer terms of their first year. They will normally complete their child/adolescent assessment hours 1 day/week during the spring/summer term of their first year and the fall term of their second year. Group didactic seminars will be scheduled to cover special topics in assessment as relevant to the services provided at the PWC. 0 ch
PSYC6632 Intervention Practicum Students are required to complete a minimum of 250 practicum hours in intervention activities at the UNB Psychological Wellness Centre (PWC). These hours should be split approximatley equally between activities that target/child adolescent clients and adult clients. Students will normally complete their adult interventions hours 1 day/week during the winter and the spring/summer terms of their second year. They will normally complete their child/adolescent intervention hours 1 day/week during the spring/summer term of their second year and the fall term of their third year. Group didactic seminars will be scheduled to cover special topics in intervention as relevant to the services provided at PWC. 0 ch
PSYC6633 Clinical Supervision Practicum Students are required to complete a minimum of 50 practicum hours providing supervision of junior practicum students at the UNB Psychological Wellness Centre (PWC). Theses supervision activities will, in turn, be supervised by the Director of the PWC. Students will normally complete their supervision hours 1 day/week during the spring/summer term of their second year. They will begin with providing supervision of assessment activities and will progress to supervising psychotherapy activities should time permit. Group didactic seminars will be scheduled to cover the theoretical models of clinical supervision. 0 ch
PSYC6634 Advanced Clinical Practicum I Students are required to complete a minimum of 400 practicum hours in a pre-authorized practicum setting of their choice. Psyc 6634 may be focused on child/adolescent and/or adult populations, but must be completed as three to four month full-time clinical placement. The aim of this advanced practicum is to provide students with an opportunity to acquire clinical skills related to a specialized clinical problem or more advanced skills with a particular clinilca population. This advanced practicum will normally be completed in the summer term of the third year. In order to be credited toward practicum hours, the necessary documentation must be submitted to the Practicum Coordinator. Please refer to the Practicum Policy Manual for further details. 0 ch
PSYC6635 Advanced Clinical Practicum Students have the option of completing a second advanced practicum in pre-authorized setting. The aim of this second advanced practicum is to provide students with an opportunity to acquire additional clinical skills on a specialized clinical problem or more advanced skills with a particular clinical population. This practicum may be taken on either a full-time or a part-time basis as long as the student spends at least 250 hours in the selected practicum (i.e., setting or clinical rotation) and has not previously completed a practicum in the same setting. In order to be credited toward practicum hours, the necessary documentation must be submitted to the Practicum Coordinator. Please refer to the Practicum Policy Manual for further details. 0 ch
PSYC6641 Experimental Psychology Practicum This course designed to provide students with opportunities to establish link with community partners and expand their research, academic, and practical skills in applied settings. Students may complete a practice placement in any setting provided that the placement has been approved by the Director of the Experimental Program. The placement must be completed during a consecutive 3 to 4 month period. Requirements will be determined mutually by the student, the Experimental Program Director, and the site supervisor, but will include a written final report. The Experimental Program Director will assign credit (i.e., CR or NCR) when the student has completed the practicum requirements. cr/ncr
PSYC6814 Dissertation Proposal The intent of this requirement is to use the dissertation proposal to demonstrate student’s comprehensive knowledge of their dissertation area. Students shall prepare a proposal document including complete Introduction, Method, Proposed Analyses and Reference Sections, as well as any necessary appendices. The Introduction section should include a broad consideration of the literature in the relevant area(s). It should demonstrate the student’s comprehensive and broad knowledge and understanding of the relevant literature, in addition to the background and rationale for the proposed study. This material may be presented within the Introduction section, or in an Introduction with accompanying Appendix. If the latter model (with an Appendix) is adopted by the student, it is expected that the Introduction section will be in a form that is appropriate for use as the Introduction section of a journal article. In this case, the Appendix should contain the comprehensive literature review. Although modifications may be required at various points in the process, this document is intended to be ready to use in the final dissertation write-up. Credit for PSYC 6814 will be assigned after satisfactory completion of PSYC 6833 (Oral Presentation of the Dissertation Proposal) and final approval of the dissertation proposal by the student’s supervisory committee. Required course. 3 ch
PSYC6823 Comprehensive Project The purpose of the comprehensive project is to provide students with an opportunity to demonstrate the integration of theory, critical thinking and evaluation in an experimental or applied context. The project must be on a topic that is not connected with the doctoral thesis. The student is expected to take initiative in proposing a suitable project and to work quite independently with consultation from a designated faculty member of the department who will offer guidance and advice as needed. All comprehensive projects must have prior approval of the Experimental Program Committee before implementation. Upon completion the project will be evaluated by two faculty members approved by the Experimental Program Committee. The comprehensive project can be a review paper, a grant proposal, or a research project in a minor area with a member of the GAU other than the supervisor. Students are strongly encouraged (but not required) to submit their comprehensive project to an appropriate journal/grant agency. Required course. 3 ch
PSYC6833 Oral Presentation of the Dissertation Proposal The oral presentation of the dissertation proposal is intended to demonstrate the student’s comprehensive knowledge of the area, to inform the department of the student’s research (the dissertation’s rationale, hypotheses, and methods), and to allow the student and the supervisory committee to receive input from faculty and graduate students. All members of the supervisory committee are required to attend the oral presentation, and should be prepared to initiate the discussion that will follow the presentation. Based on the presentation and ensuing discussion, the supervisory committee may identify additional revisions to be made to the proposal document. This process is intended to serve as the student’s (and committee’s) assurance that the proposal is acceptable to the department, and that it contains no serious flaws or other problems that would ultimately make it unacceptable as a dissertation. Required course.
PSYC6997 Master's Thesis (Optional) All students are admitted at the Master's level in the first year. At the end of the first year, students are evaluated on their academic performance (students in the Clinical Program also are evaluated on their clinical potential), and a recommendation is made on whether they are admitted to the doctoral program. Although the expectation is that all students will proceed into the doctoral program, occasionally a student may not be admitted into the Ph.D. program. Students who are not recommended to proceed into the doctoral program may be permitted to continue their training education at the Master's level. This will require that they complete a Master's thesis. For these students, any research carried out in fulfillment of PSYC 6522 Research II may be considered toward fulfillment of the Master's thesis.
PSYC6998 P.h.D. Thesis In accordance with regulations set out by the Graduate School students register in PSYC 6998 in their first term of enrollment in the Ph.D. degree. The dissertation proposal will be written under the guidance of a thesis advisor and dissertation committee. Once the proposal is acceptable to the dissertation committee, it will be presented to the department as a colloquium. Although the approval of the proposal rests solely with the thesis committee, the student, supervisor and thesis committee should take any comments or concerns expressed during the "proposal colloquium" into consideration. After receiving written notification of the acceptance of the dissertation proposal and completing the "proposal colloquium", the student is expected to conduct the research during the fourth year. For students in the Clinical Program, the thesis is often written while the student is enrolled in a predoctoral clinical internship and the results are presented at an oral defense subsequent to completion of their year of clinical internship training. Required course.Prerequisites: completion of all course requirements. 0 ch